Author Topic: Social Networks  (Read 971 times)

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Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #30 on: March 20, 2013, 02:17:16 pm »
Oh hell no...

.... now let's see how long Instagram lasts....

Bhwaaaaaaaaaa-haaaaaaaaaaaa-haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
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Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #31 on: July 03, 2013, 10:01:44 am »
Ad Campaign Uses Powerful Photographs to Explain that Facebook Likes Don’t Help



Quote
When they were tasked with putting together a powerful advertising campaign for Crisis Relief Singapore, ad agency Publicis Singapore mixed heart-wrenching photos with a hard-to-swallow tagline to create something quite moving.

The campaign is based around the tag line: “Liking Isn’t Helping,” and it uses press photos of flood, earthquake and war victims surrounded by hands coming from outside the frame giving them a “thumbs up,” symbolizing the Facebook “like.”



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The thumbs ups have been Photoshopped in, but the message is clear. Since the C.R.S. is run by volunteers, they want people to understand that clicking like or share on Facebook, while it might help spread the word, doesn’t actually make a difference to a crisis victim.



Quote
To drive the point home even further, the ad copy at the bottom right reads “Be a Volunteer. Change a Life.” To learn more about C.R.S. and how you can help their cause, head over to the organization’s website by clicking here.
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Chiprocks1

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #32 on: July 03, 2013, 11:10:52 am »
If that isn't a scathing indictment to all those on Facebook, then I don't know what is. FYI, I agree 100% with this Ad Campaign.
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Michael Scott To Meredith: "You've slept with so many men, your starting to look like one. BOOM! Roasted! Go here.

Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #33 on: July 30, 2013, 09:25:21 am »
Another casualty of Social Network. Seriously, there is such a huge gap with generations on what is considered acceptable of socializing. Don't feel bad for this woman at all.

Alabama TV reporter fired over blog post


http://video.today.msnbc.msn.com/today/52619485
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Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #34 on: August 07, 2013, 09:25:33 am »
New documentary examines the global impact of Twitter

Video
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Chiprocks1

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #35 on: August 07, 2013, 09:27:12 am »
7 years since the creation of Twitter? I think I have a total of 7 tweets in the same time frame. And I was probably drunk when I did the tweeting.  ;D
Chip's Rockin' Art
Michael Scott To Meredith: "You've slept with so many men, your starting to look like one. BOOM! Roasted! Go here.

Chiprocks1

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #36 on: August 07, 2013, 09:30:38 am »
New documentary examines the global impact of Twitter

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy


Posted the video to see if the Todaycode was valid. Seems like it's working now. It never worked before. I don't think it did. Anyway....
Chip's Rockin' Art
Michael Scott To Meredith: "You've slept with so many men, your starting to look like one. BOOM! Roasted! Go here.

Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #37 on: August 07, 2013, 09:53:01 am »
Yaaaa, it works now. I'll try to remember that.
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Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #38 on: August 09, 2013, 09:00:14 am »
This is not simple as it sounds and it immediately takes a tangent direction  with regards to tipping, ignoring the whole tweet war altogether. And in the whole context of the article, yes the tweet war is stupid (take note of you folks who tweet), and the tipping issue becomes central. I still have faith in people.  Read the comments section too.

Food Truck Justice: Heated Tweet to Financial Firm Gets Worker Fired


New Yorker Brendan O’Connor lost his job last week.

Normally, this would not make for a particularly newsworthy story, but O’Connor’s tale is different, in part because it all started with a tweet of his, shown below.

Quote
Brendan O'Connor @OConnorB_

Shout out to the good people of Glass, Lewis & Co. for placing a $170 order and not leaving a tip. @glasslewis

Thing is, the @GlassLewis in question above is the San Francisco-based shareholder advisory firm of Glass Lewis & Co., which didn’t take too kindly to the public tip-shaming. The company called O’Connor’s boss at Milk Truck, a food truck business specializing in grilled cheese sandwiches, to complain about the accusatory tweet. Two days later, O’Connor’s brief career in food service was over. Milk Truck publicly apologized and the episode was put to rest.

Quote
Milk Truck @milktrucknyc

@glasslewis rgrding yest. tweet by an employee--it was flat out wrong. we do NOT in any way support or condone this behavior-our apologies.


 Glass Lewis & Co. @GlassLewis

@milktrucknyc We appreciate it, and look forward to doing business with you again!

Except that it wasn’t.

Turns out, O’Connor moonlights as a reporter for the New York City culture blog The Awl, and he wrote a lengthy article on the firing, including lurid details about Glass Lewis’s tip-snubbing employees, that ran it on Tuesday. It read, in part:

    "This group placed a huge order: three of this sandwich, four of another, three of the one that takes forever on the grill, two of the one that takes forever to assemble. Five or six milkshakes. The order came to just under $170.

    "I was making sandwiches, another worker took the order and a third made the milkshakes and watched the grills. A line grew while we worked, and we had to tell other customers that their lunch orders would take longer than usual. They paid; I asked my co-worker who was dealing with the money how much of a tip they’d left. They had left actually no tip at all. (They had paid with a card so we checked the cash tips to see if there’d been a bump. There hadn’t.)

    "I asked some of the group as they were picking up their orders if they had intended to not tip. They hemmed and hawed and walked away."


The reaction was swift and impassioned. Readers swarmed social media to berate Milk Truck and Glass Lewis over the incident with expletive-riddled rants, in an effort that at times seemed to suggest Americans had found a new reason to distrust the financial services industry. O'Connor quickly became a folk hero among service workers.

and onto the comments
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Chiprocks1

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #39 on: August 09, 2013, 09:07:15 am »

This is just one of the reasons why I don't eat in restaurants. I take the whole tipping thing out of the equation and won't have to worry about being tip-shamed. Whenever tipping is mentioned in conversation, I can't help but name drop Reservoir Dogs.
Chip's Rockin' Art
Michael Scott To Meredith: "You've slept with so many men, your starting to look like one. BOOM! Roasted! Go here.

Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #40 on: August 09, 2013, 09:28:17 am »
Classic... now. Coincidentally The Dave Glover Show was going over 'tipping' recently. Many different points of view of when, who, why, etc.

Me, I tip straight 20% for good food and service. If need be, the food or service sucks, then I rethink it.

I never tip fast food. Honestly, what is the difference between McDonalds and Starbucks. Nada
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Chiprocks1

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #41 on: August 14, 2013, 09:26:52 am »
When You Die, Does Your Facebook Go, Too?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyBkdo87Oe8
Chip's Rockin' Art
Michael Scott To Meredith: "You've slept with so many men, your starting to look like one. BOOM! Roasted! Go here.

Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #42 on: August 15, 2013, 09:50:24 am »
Even more proof, social networking, is providing bad habits and life lessons. This is bad.

Boys also harmed by teen 'hookup' culture, experts say

http://video.today.msnbc.msn.com/today/52762161

Quote
A 15-year-old girl sits in high school English class when a text message pops up on her cellphone. It's from a boy sitting across the room. He hardly knows her, but he likes her. Here's how he chooses to get that message across:

Him: "So, are you good at hooking up?"

Her: "Um idk. I don't really think about that."

Him: "Well, I want my d--k in your mouth? Will you at least be my girlfriend."

It's the kind of scenario that's playing out among teens across America, illustrating an increasing confusion among boys about how to behave, experts say. In the casual-sex "hookup" culture, courtship happens by text and tweet. Boys send X-rated propositions to girls in class. Crude photos, even **** photos, play a role once reserved for the handwritten note saying, "Hey, I like you."

According to new research, boys who engage in this kind of sexualized behavior say they have no intention to be hostile or demeaning — precisely the opposite. While they admit they are pushing limits, they also think they are simply courting. They describe it as "goofing around, flirting," said Catherine Steiner-Adair, a clinical psychologist and school consultant who interviewed 1,000 students nationwide for her new book, "The Big Disconnect: Protecting Childhood and Family Relationships in the Digital Age."

How the hookup culture affects young people has long been debated and lamented, in books and blogs, among parents and teachers. A general consensus is that it harms girls, although some have argued that it empowers them. The effect on boys, however, is less often part of the discussion.

Conventional wisdom tends to oversimplify the situation to something along the lines of: Boys get to have sex, which is really all they want. They are seen as predators, and girls, their prey.

Reality is far more complex than this, in ways that can affect young men socially and emotionally well into adulthood, according to Steiner-Adair. It's "insufficient, superficial and polarizing when boys simply get cast as aggressors and girls as victims," she said. In her view, girls can certainly suffer negative consequences from the hookup culture. Her point is: Boys can, too. "It's such a bad part of our culture to think that boys aren't also harmed," she says. "We are neglecting the emotional lives of boys."

In interviews and focus groups, Steiner-Adair talked with boys and girls ages 4 to 18 at suburban public and private schools, with consent from parents and schools, about their relationships and influences. Kids from the fourth grade and up shared their private texts and Facebook posts, unveiling the dating landscape. In one case, a boy sent a naked snapshot of himself to his girlfriend, with a suggestive caption. The girl, who had never seen her boyfriend naked, was shocked, and said she felt the relationship had suddenly lost its innocence. "I was so mad about that," she said. The girl's reaction, in turn, surprised the boy. He really liked her. His behavior, said Steiner-Adair, was "aggressive in a way that boys don't understand."

Steiner-Adair also saw the string of texts between the 15-year-old girl in English class and her suitor. The girl described the conversation as "a stupid, disgusting exchange," adding that it was "typical for the boys at our school." Still, the girl became intrigued when the boy revealed in a subsequent note that he liked her. The girl wondered if she should tell him how his initial approach had offended her. Then she started to cry, questioning whether it was worth the effort.

Teenagers have never been known for their social grace. But this generation is navigating adolescence with a new digital tool kit — Facebook, Twitter — that has the unintended side effect of subtracting important social cues, according to Steiner-Adair. Nuance and body language are lost in translation.

She also noted the influence of online ****. Students across the country asked Steiner-Adair about graphic images they had seen. One boy said, "I don't get it — why would a woman get turned on by being choked?" A girl asked her if it was normal to have anal sex.

Another boy showed her pornographic notes that two of his friends had secretly sent to a girl from his own Facebook page, including, "Your challenge is to go for weeks without d--ks in all four of your holes." When the boy found out about the prank, he wasn't upset, but amused. "This is just my friends being idiots, basically," he said. "They were just trying to be funny." Steiner-Adair asked why the exchange had turned so nasty and the boy said, "It didn't turn nasty. That's the norm for our generation."

To be sure, some boys have always been crude. The new extremes, said Steiner-Adair, can be damaging. Boys don't benefit, she said, from learning to be demeaning toward girls or to treat them as sexual objects. She said boys often expressed a desire for a deeper connection with girls, but felt confused about how to make it happen. They are "yearning for intimacy that goes beyond biology," she said. "They just don't know how to achieve it."

Andrew Smiler, a developmental psychologist, agrees. He examined some 600 studies on masculinity, sex and relationships for his book "Challenging Casanova," concluding that most young men are more motivated by love than sex. Pop culture helps spur the disconnect between what young men want and how they often act, he argues, citing as an example the show "Two and a Half Men." "The jerk gets all the laugh lines," he said. "The nice guy always looks like a sap."

That theory is debated. Steven Rhoads, a professor who teaches a class on sex differences at the University of Virginia, said he analyzed decades worth of research on sexuality and biology for his book "Taking Sex Differences Seriously" to conclude that men and women are "hardwired" differently. Hookups have deeper psychological costs for women, he said, noting that anecdotes from his students back up the research: Female students often tell him they are hurt by casual sex in a way that male students are not. The boys don't know it, he said, because the girls don't want to tell them.

For boys and girls alike, crucial lessons in how to relate to each other are getting lost in the blizzard of tweets and texts, experts say. The cues kids would pick up from a live conversation — facial expressions, gestures — are absent from the arm's-length communications that are now a fixture of growing up. The fast-paced technology also "deletes the pause" between impulse and action, said Steiner-Adair, who calls texting the "worst possible training ground" for developing mature relationships. Dan Slater, the author of "Love in the Time of Algorithms," agrees. "You can manage an entire relationship with text messages," he said, but that keeps some of the "messy relationship stuff" at bay. "That's the stuff that helps people grow up," he added.

The key to developing solid relationships lies partly in early education, said Steiner-Adair. To that end, some schools are launching classes focused on social and emotional issues, with teachers talking about gender, language, social media and healthy relationships.

Also critical, according to Steiner-Adair, is family time spent away from screens. In her research, teens often said their parents were embroiled in work or personal interests and simply not available. Some parents said they were intimidated by their children's complaints and exploits, and didn't want to seem ignorant or helpless. The heart of the matter for families, she said, is good old-fashioned talking — the kind you do face to face.
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Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #43 on: September 05, 2013, 09:36:43 am »
I knew the pendulum would start swinging the other way. I wonder if it will fully swing to opposite side and people get off the grid?

Half of Americans online worry about privacy, says study

Quote
Lynn Boyden, a college professor in Los Angeles who teaches website design, says she has developed two identities online: a public one for her professional life and a private one that only a few close friends can access. She tries to block advertising trackers when she can and limits what personal data might wind up on public sites.

It's an approach that she says works, although it takes time and attention.

"It's a sliding scale," said Boyden of what information she chooses to share. "Some things are and should be private."

Americans might be sharing more personal information online than ever through social networking sites and email. But they also want to better control who can see it, according to a study released Thursday by the Pew Research Center's Internet and American Life Project.

The study reported that privacy concerns among Americans are on the rise, with 50 percent of Internet users saying they are worried about the information available about them online, up from 33 percent in 2009. Meanwhile, 86 percent of people surveyed have tried at least one technique to hide their activity online or avoid being tracked, such as clearing cookies or their browser history or using encryption.

More...
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Neumatic

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #44 on: September 05, 2013, 08:54:34 pm »
I keep thinking there's gonna be an analog internet type thing breaking out in the near future, almost steampunky.  The sneakernet is gonna be HUGE, I'm already thinking it might not be a bad idea to have one computer that's never connected to the internet.  It's a shame we're being driven to this but what are you gonna do?  We're living in a cyberpunk novel now.

 

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