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Author Topic: Social Networks  (Read 1297 times)

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Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #75 on: October 16, 2014, 08:31:21 am »
Ah, I see what you did there.
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Chiprocks1

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #76 on: October 16, 2014, 08:54:34 am »
Seriously, I did open an account a while back but I haven't done anything with it. Not sure I ever will.
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Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #77 on: October 16, 2014, 09:20:10 am »
There was something there to definitely spark my interest. What I saw was a ton of pictures organized in a way to easily see vs. a google search which is to broad.

I'll probably explore it more this fall and winter. I just don't know beyond 'looking'... what to do.
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Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #78 on: January 02, 2015, 10:10:11 am »
Too funny

Megatron Speaks the Truth about Social sites

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5rpbCQlo6Q
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Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #79 on: January 08, 2015, 09:37:58 am »
and I thought Selfies were world class lows.... but No!

Then again, if I had been the one to patent this, I'm all about the success.

BelfieStick



Quote
ust when it seems the phone-loving public couldn’t get more self-absorbed than the selfie stick,  which helps a person take a photo of himself,  say hello to the BelfieStick.

What’s a belfie?

If you’ve ever seen a photograph of Kim Kardashian taking a photo of her own backside, you know what a belfie is.

Apparently, even those of us without the attributes or marketing savvy to make a buck on buttocks are both obsessed — and frustrated — with the picture-taking process.

Many belfies are taken in the bathroom, because of the challenge of contorting one’s self to be able to hold the camera, frame and focus the shot, and snap the photo over your shoulder.

Problem solved with the BelfieStick.

While the selfie stick is generally a straight pole, which holds the camera phone, the BelfieStick is bendable and allows the would-be photo star to angle the extend arm and camera mount to facilitates an as-casual-as-possible photo of a person posing with their own derriere.

According to Business Insider, the BelfieStick was created by ON.com.

“We’ve noticed a huge spike in users taking butt selfies in recent months,” ON.com’s chief technology officer Kevin Deegan tells Business Insider. “So the natural next step was for us to develop a device to assist our users in taking one.”

Demand seems to be outpacing supply — the BelfieStick website says they are currently out of stock.

However, the site is taking pre-orders for the $79.99 stick.
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Chiprocks1

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #80 on: January 08, 2015, 10:48:53 am »
Ack!
Chip's Rockin' Art
Michael Scott To Meredith: "You've slept with so many men, your starting to look like one. BOOM! Roasted! Go here.

Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #81 on: January 12, 2015, 09:32:13 am »
I'll put this here, since IMO, this is a social thing... though it's a personal thing?

Like smoking, I just can't wrap my head around this phenomena. I just don't give a flip about my phone.

It's official: iPhone withdrawal anxiety exists and it will make you bad at work



Quote
Do you feel anxious and tetchy when you’re separated from your phone? Do you feel like a part of you is missing? You are not alone, a new study shows.

Researchers found that iPhone users who are unable to answer their phone experience a faster heart rate, increased blood pressure, higher levels of anxiety and unpleasantness and even a lower sense of self, all of which decreases their ability to perform thinking tasks.

For the experiment, 40 iPhone users were asked to complete two five-minute word search puzzles, one with their phone next to them and one with their phone in a cubby hole four feet away. During the third minute of the task where the user and the phone were separated, the researchers called the participants’ phones and let them ring for 20 seconds.

The study, which was published in the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, discovered that the participants identified fewer words in the puzzle when they were pining for their phone, and they reported stronger feelings of anxiety and unpleasantness, which was corroborated by physiological evidence of increased blood pressure and heart rate.

The researchers -- the University of Missouri’s Russell B.Clayton, the University of Oklahoma’s Glenn Leshner and Indiana University's Anthony Almond -- pointed to the increasing physical and emotional attachments that humans have with their mobile phones.

Psychiatrists have even coined a new term for this discomfort disorder: Nomophobia, a portmanteau of “no mobile phone” and phobia, which is believed to affect two-thirds of people in the UK and as many as 77pc of 18 to 24 year olds, according to a 2012 report.

The researchers cited a previous study by James Harkin, who proposed that mobile phones have become embedded in modern people’s sense of self because they “‘function as comfort objects, antidotes to the hostile terrain of wider society,’ and have become entities so intimately a part of us that they are capable of representing ‘an extension of our physical selves – an umbilical cord, anchoring the information society's digital infrastructure to our very bodies.’”

When that umbilical cord is cut, even momentarily, the level of psychological and physiological distress is strong enough to kill a person’s concentration and inhibit their ability to work.

It might be worth keeping this on file for the next time your boss tells you off for being on your phone at work.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2015, 09:34:01 am by Mac »
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Chiprocks1

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #82 on: January 12, 2015, 02:25:57 pm »
I think it's just as real as anything else one becomes attached to. When it's taken away, their is a natural tendency for withdrawal. Case in point, I'll use two personal examples: My Cell Phone and my Computer. In the case of my Cell Phone, even though I was never obsessive about it like most people are, when I finally cut the cord and cancelled my contract and went cold turkey, I still went through an adjustment period of it being gone and this coming from someone that really didn't give a f*ck about even having one to begin with. So, those that live and die by their phones today, I can see how it can be a problem when suddenly face to face without one.

As for my Computer, I definitely fall into the category of "obsessive" because I do so much with it, be it work related, entertainment and checking in on what Mac, Neumatic and the rest of Penny Can are doing.  A couple of times when my PC went belly up and I had to take it in for repairs, ranging from 1-2 weeks turn around time, I went through major withdrawals. I didn't know what to do with myself. Even TV couldn't fix the problem. I was cut off from the "outside world", even though it actually sent me.....outside. Ack! I don't miss my phone. Not one bit. Glad to be done with it. But I couldn't function without my PC. I'd go stir crazy if I knew I'd be without it for an extended period of time.
Chip's Rockin' Art
Michael Scott To Meredith: "You've slept with so many men, your starting to look like one. BOOM! Roasted! Go here.

Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #83 on: January 18, 2015, 11:47:24 am »
Why people use Facebook to avoid facing real life

Dis\Connect



Quote
Doug Hindson's short Dis\connect gives a powerful answer to an important question:Why do we keep sharing our edited lives and avidly connecting to others through Facebook, Twitter, or Whatsapp all the time? His answer is simple, one that I'm sure you have all thought about before.

Deep down we are afraid of the moments when we are alone, he says, because this is when our deepest regrets and worries come flooding in. These are the moments when our own existential angst becomes solid, heavy, painfully sharp: "I wonder what I would be doing if weren't doing this," he asks, "would I be the person I have always feared I'd become... or would I be the person I'd always dreamed I'd be?"

We escape that time alone through constant connection and exhibition out of fear of facing the ultimate truths about ourselves.

The worst thing is that this defense mechanism has also become an escape for moments in which we are physically with others. We sink our noses in our phones at parties and dinners out of fear of establishing deeper connections, of talking too much, of getting involved, of failing, of causing the wrong impression.

It's a sad world in which we live in, my friends, but don't worry, because you are not the first to feel his way. The hardest questions of all—"who am I? What do I want to be? Am I spending my limited time on Earth being who I really want to be?"—have occupied the human mind since the beginning of recorded human history and probably before. The only difference between us and the men and women of previous generations—or the men and women in other less developed countries—is that some of us have too much free time and they didn't.

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Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #84 on: February 10, 2015, 10:21:47 am »
Interesting stuff... we've kinda of addressed some of the 'over-sharing' opinions here.

What the offensive tweets of Jeb Bush’s new aide say about growing up in the oversharing age

Quote
No sooner had 31-year-old Ethan Czahor been hired by Jeb Bush than certain old, unsavory tidbits vanished from his Twitter feed. In January 2010, when he was 25, the Bush PAC’s new technology lead had tweeted some tasteless commentary about gay men at his gym. A couple months earlier, Czahor had made several off-color jokes about “sluts,” sex and drunk-driving.

It’s not exactly the kind of behavior you want to see from the guy who’s supposed to save your party’s digital image — which is perhaps why news of Czahor’s deleted tweets has rocketed around the Internet like some gate-suffixed scandal. But who are we kidding, honestly? This is the new normal, in politics and every other field: Everyone of Czahor’s generation and younger will come with some kind of digital dirt, some ancient tweet to be deleted or beer-pong portrait to untag. As Czahor tweeted yesterday:

Well … yeah, okay.

At 31, Czahor is on the cusp of a generation that lived its teenage and young-adult years almost entirely online, where their antics were often public, regrettable and permanently archived. Myspace launched just as Czahor was turning 20, and Facebook went national in late 2006, when he was 24. Czahor was still in college in eastern Pennsylvania when he started his now-infamous Twitter account; at that point, only three years after the site’s founding, most users hadn’t figured out what Twitter was even for.

Incoming Obama administration director of speechwriting Jon Favreau (L) and a friend pose with a cardboard cutout of incoming Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton at a party. (Obtained by The Washington Post)


That doesn’t necessarily excuse Czahor’s tweets, which — to be clear — were appalling. But 20-something kids right out of school aren’t necessarily pondering the long-term impact of their posts. There was the case of 27-year-old Obama speechwriter Jon Favreau, who was tagged in a Facebook party pic groping a cut-out of Hilary Clinton in 2008. (Favreau had to contact Clinton with an apology.) There was the John McCain aide who resigned after a controversial anti-Obama clip was found on his private Twitter feed.

Even Benjamin Cole, the congressional adviser who resigned over racist Facebook posts uncovered last week, seems not to have understood the concept of the digital footprint: As early as 2010, and as late as this year, Cole had posted gross and unfathomable screeds to his Facebook page.

Cole is 38; Czahor is 31 — both of them, at least, came to social media as adults. We can’t exactly say the same thing of today’s 13- and 14- and 15-year-olds, all bae-ing their hearts out under their real, Google-able names. According to data from the Pew Research Center, modern teens are posting more information publicly, not less — though there are signs that many understand the longevity, and the consequences, of their digital footprint. In 2012, more than half of teens said they decided not to post something because it could eventually make them look bad.



Of course, that still leaves something like 15 million kids posting whatever they want, whenever they want, since smartphones allow them more or less constant Internet access. By the time they grow up and run for public office, opposition research will be a defunct industry: You don’t need to dig through property records and newspaper clippings when you can just pull a CTRL+F on somebody’s tweets.

Then again, if oversharing’s the new normal, maybe we’ll grow accustomed to youthful Internet indiscretions like these. As a society, we’ve already adapted to a thousand other impositions of the digital age — the phone out at dinner, the constant availability, the rise (and fall) of the “thank you” e-mail — that bending the rules for a few tweets doesn’t seem like such a stretch.

I’m reminded of an acquaintance who’s long dreamed of running for political office and maintains an active Instagram of simpering, duck-faced party pics. By the time she runs, in 10 years or 20, will those photos air in attack ads? Or will voters be into it?

There’s a third option too, of course: Maybe, by 2030 or so, we’ll all be deeply beholden to digital reputation-scrubbing services. That industry’s booming already: Companies like Go Fish Digital will scrub your Facebook of lewd photos, comb through your old tweets, and otherwise make sure your Google results look squeaky-clean.

It almost makes you wonder why Czahor didn’t contact one of those firms before he became the Bush PAC’s CTO. For a digital messiah, the guy seems … kind of slow.

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Chiprocks1

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #85 on: March 19, 2015, 11:46:59 am »
Vince Neil Is Suing Woman Who Used to Run His Facebook Account


I could post this in a nu,ber of threads. Hell, I even wrestled with the idea of creating a new thread titled 'Stupid of the Day". But since the contents and context is about Social Media, it will reside here. As for Vince, he has to be dumb to think that turning over his Facebook page to someone else would not end well. Of course she is going to trade on his fame and namesake. Duh.
Chip's Rockin' Art
Michael Scott To Meredith: "You've slept with so many men, your starting to look like one. BOOM! Roasted! Go here.

Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #86 on: March 19, 2015, 03:09:22 pm »
Wouldn't this reveal, at least in someways, celebrity social connections have the real possibility of being fake and disingenuous? What's real anymore?

As I think back, it started for me when music artists performed live to tape. That was the start.

Today folks don't care if they are seeing or hearing the real thing. If you perceive it as real... Well then it's real.

So sad. I don't care about Vince and his 'troubles'
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Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #87 on: May 12, 2015, 10:47:23 am »
Periscope App



Have you guys heard about this? Am I just now hearing about it. In all honesty... I don't care either. But some of the young guys on the Dave Glover Show I listen to are just going nuts over this app. Honestly, it sounds incredibly stupid. Then again, I think Facebook and Twitter are majorly stupid. But I'm sure there are good uses it for it.

But these guys are so excited about the most mundane things.

Essentially you broadcast live video to others as it's happening. So Max was getting all giggly about how he was broadcasting to some folks about his recent viewing of Avengers. He gave an after movie question and answer with about 250 people. Some in Asia. That actually sounded like it might have merit. But then they got all excited about watching Tom Green drive home from a party. And other C list celebrity's go grocery shopping or just walking down the street talking about life.

WTF

I seriously don't understand this. Im sure age has a lot to do with it. But my gawd, what excites people today is mind boggeling.

Dave's show then drifted into using Periscope at the recent big Maryweather fight. Yep, tons of folks broadcasting live from their TV, the $100 ticket fight... for free. I just wonder what kind of doors this is going to open up... or close.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2015, 10:49:42 am by Mac »
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Mac

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #88 on: June 17, 2015, 09:37:45 am »
Funny stuff here....

First Textual Experience with Aziz Ansari

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CaBI5bYc38k
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Chiprocks1

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Re: Social Networks
« Reply #89 on: February 25, 2016, 11:28:03 am »
ISIS threatens Facebook and Twitter CEOs


Does anyone see the irony in this? They condemn America and all that it comes with, yet they rely heavily on using our tech. This threat is only going to spur Zuckerburg to be even more determined to shut them down.
Chip's Rockin' Art
Michael Scott To Meredith: "You've slept with so many men, your starting to look like one. BOOM! Roasted! Go here.

 

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