Author Topic: The Walking Dead (Season 2)  (Read 957 times)

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Chiprocks1

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Re: The Walking Dead (Season 2)
« Reply #15 on: August 24, 2011, 02:18:14 pm »
Has Season 2 even started yet?
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Re: The Walking Dead (Season 2)
« Reply #16 on: August 24, 2011, 02:39:51 pm »
Has Season 2 even started yet?

Not til spooky month
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Re: The Walking Dead (Season 2)
« Reply #17 on: September 07, 2011, 06:52:01 am »
a little over a month away

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The Walking Dead's executive producer and show-runner Glen Mazzara describes turning Rick into a bad guy, explains what The Walking Dead has in common with police dramas and shares the Number 1 rule for writing horror. New Dispatches From the Set are released every week throughout the production.

Q: How did your family react to the news you'd been named The Walking Dead's show-runner?

A: A lot of people are lining up to be zombies. I actually brought my sons over to Greg Nicotero's workshop, and part of me is I want to be made a zombie too. So maybe that will be a cameo some day, I don't know. My son seemed to have a lot of unique ways to kill zombies. None that I really am interested in putting on TV, but that's a big topic of conversation at the dinner table.

Q: You wrote Season 1 Episode 5, "Wildfire." How did that experience compare to helping craft a whole season's narrative arc?

A: Well, last year I wasn't available to staff Season 1. So I was offered a freelance, and really just enjoyed it. I saw what Frank's intention was with the show and sort of broke the story and wrote to fulfill that. So then this year he brought me on to staff and we hired a great writing staff and we really worked out the season arc. So a lot of it is just following that road map. There will certainly be surprises and deviations from that, but I think for the most part, the characters' journeys were discussed in depth at the beginning of the season. What's been surprising is that in the graphic novel the story that takes place on Hershel's farm is really only a few issues. We've been able to mine that for many episodes, and we're very excited about the depth to which we're able to push the characters, the different dynamics that we're able to explore.

Q: What particularly surprised you about this material?

A: Our approach to our group of survivors when they reach Hershel's farm is that they are a plague unto themselves. Nothing goes right for Hershel once Rick and his band show up. They make the zombie apocalypse look like kids in a candy story. What's interesting is that if this was a show solely about Hershel, Rick and his band would really be the antagonists. And that's been really surprising because every action that Rick and his band take is completely logical, but you'll certainly sympathize with Hershel.

Q: You've worked on several police dramas like The Shield. Is it strange to now be writing about a cop who is so far out of his element?

A: Not really. The Shield was a very character-driven, yet action-packed visceral show. So I find writing The Walking Dead to be very similar. It's about character moments and yet you have -- just like in an urban police drama -- anything could go wrong at any minute. One of the things that is different than the shows I've written in the past is that this is a horror show. And I am always cognizant of the fact that people are fighting for their lives and that you have those traditional scares from horror movies that you want to play in a fun, surprising way.

Q: What's the Number 1 rule of writing horror?

A: Keep the zombies scary. Zombies move slow and our guys have guns. So I have to make sure that our band is always threatened, that they're panicked. For this show to be scary, we need to be convinced that the zombies are winning. So we really push ourselves as writers to make sure that we are not playing the same gags over and over. That every zombie feels unique, they feel different, that we want each encounter with a zombie to be memorable and not just throwing in a zombie for the sake of throwing in a cheap thrill. I feel that we have to make sure our characters are always in jeopardy. There is an issue with writing a TV show where you can't kill off a main character every week--

Q: As much as Robert Kirkman would want to...

A: Yes exactly. And you can say that: "As much as Robert Kirkman would want to..." Quote yourself. So you have a lot of close calls and you need to make sure that those are scary and that they lead to character moments coming out of them.

Q: This is the second time you've run a show that's an adaptation of an existing property -- the first being Crash. What's the secret to an adaptation's success?

A: What's great about this adaptation is that Robert Kirkman is such a huge part of it. In Crash, the writers and director of the film were involved at certain points, not involved at others, and then when the show deviated from what they believed Crash meant, I had a problem as a show-runner. On this show Robert has been very open to letting us tell our own story. Robert sees them as two different works of art -- and they're not in conflict with each other. As long as it's good and as long as it's scary, he's happy.

Q: That said, what element from the comic are you most looking forward to adapting?

A: I am dying to meet the Governor.

Q: You just made every fanboy's day.

A: There you go. And can I say something about our fanboys? We have a fantastic scene in our fourth episode this season that I believe will make every fanboy happy. It'll give them hope that if they can make it through the zombie apocalypse, they can get laid off a hot chick too.
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Chiprocks1

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Re: The Walking Dead (Season 2)
« Reply #18 on: September 07, 2011, 07:13:56 am »
I was under the impression that Season 2 would premiere right around Halloween. Not the case here. October 16 it is.
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Mac

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Re: The Walking Dead (Season 2)
« Reply #19 on: September 10, 2011, 03:03:28 am »
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Re: The Walking Dead (Season 2)
« Reply #20 on: September 14, 2011, 07:59:19 pm »
Walking Dead - Season 1 DVD The Complete First Season (3-Disc Special Edition)

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"Available in three versions (Special Edition DVD, Special Edition Blu-ray and Limited Edition Blu-ray Collector’s Tin), each set contains all six episodes of the first season and is loaded with NEW behind-the-scenes featurettes, audio commentaries, extra footage and the fan-requested black and white version of the pilot episode. In addition to the Blu-ray special edition, a limited edition collector’s tin contains an exclusive wearable zombie mask from NECA designed by the series own make-up artist, Greg Nicotero. The first 100,000 units of the Blu-ray and Limited Edition Collector’s Tin together includes an EXCLUSIVE Cryptozoic “The Walking Dead” trading card. "

"The Walking Dead: Season 1" hits DVD and Blu-ray on October 4th.

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Re: The Walking Dead (Season 2)
« Reply #21 on: September 16, 2011, 10:15:32 am »
Meet some of the cast members of the walking dead

Pics

and a pretty cool, very creepy poster for season 2

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Re: The Walking Dead (Season 2)
« Reply #22 on: September 16, 2011, 10:18:22 am »
Greg Nicotero's 'Walking Dead' Role Expands, Web Series Premiere Set for October 3

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Greg Nicotero's role with AMC is expanding as the Emmy-winning special effects artist on AMC's "The Walking Dead" has inked a first-look deal to develop projects for the cable network, reports THR. Under the pact, Nicotero – who took home an Emmy on Saturday for his prosthetic makeup for the zombie series – has been named co-executive producer on the drama starring Andrew Lincoln. He'll also direct an episode during Season 2, which premieres next month.

In addition, an October 3 date has been set for the "Walking Dead" six-episode web series penned by John Espositio, which tells the origin story of "Bicycle Girl," the infamous "walker" from Season 1, as she struggles to survive and protect her family as the world begins to fall apart.



Nicotero also co-owns KNB EFX Group and his film, The United Monster Talent Agency, premiered last Halloween as part of AMC’s Fearfest. His credits include Day of the Dead and nearly 800 feature films.
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Chiprocks1

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Re: The Walking Dead (Season 2)
« Reply #23 on: September 16, 2011, 11:32:05 am »
Is AMC finally going to wise up and host the episodes online or what?

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Re: The Walking Dead (Season 2)
« Reply #24 on: September 17, 2011, 10:55:51 am »
Thanks for the articles Mac. I hope its all a lot of bla bla bla I would hate it if this show takes a dive. I did not know AMC does not own Mad Men and Breaking Bad

Looking forward to season two.

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Re: The Walking Dead (Season 2)
« Reply #25 on: September 19, 2011, 01:49:23 pm »
Hey, that's what were all here for.

Today AMC unveiled the official Season 2 poster for The Walking Dead. The artwork features Rick Grimes (Andrew Lincoln) running, with drawn revolver, toward a mysterious farmhouse. The Walking Dead's special 90-minute season premiere airs Sun., Oct. 16 at 9PM | 8C on AMC.



Quote
Q: You directed the second episode of Season 1, "Guts." What's it like to go from downtown Atlanta to a rural farm?

A: There's a lot more bugs! And there's ticks! And gnats! And I'm covered in Deet all the time! I loaded up in Los Angeles, and I'm wearing all the bug-sprayed clothing that Amazon.com has been kindly delivering to me. But I would say that the biggest difference is the beauty, really. In the city, it has its own beauty but it has a lot of concrete and it was very hard and very severe: Skyscrapers, hard cement, that kind of thing. And then you come out here and you're in this gorgeous location -- everywhere you look is stunning, and I love the contrast to the horrible zombie world that we're in. So you've got the stark contrast between beauty and post-apocalyptic zombies and death.

Q: You've directed several episodes of (and are an Executive Producer on) AMC's Breaking Bad, which is known for depicting vast landscapes. Does this feel like more familiar territory?


A: We do shoot a lot in the desert in Breaking Bad. And there's a lot of starkness and it's gorgeous and a lot of light. Actually, I was looking at the light here the other day and it reminded me of New Mexico. It's just stunning when the sun's setting and rising. And a large part of that are the golden browns in the fields here.

Q: Last season you had to contend with rats. Which is worse: rats or bugs?

A: [Laughs] I knew you were going to ask me that. Hmm. I don't know, we haven't shot in the swamps yet. We went into the swamp to scout, and our driver Will had shorts and a T-shirt on. And we had to traipse through bushes and things like that. And Will is actually a biologist and he was telling us all about it and I was asking him about ticks while we were walking through these bushes, and he goes, "See, I've got ticks on me right now," and he took 10 ticks off his body. Also, the other day I was giving Jon Bernthal [Shane] notes and he pulled a tick off my neck. That was pretty gross. But rats were pretty bad, I have to say. Funny enough, I'd probably rather deal with this than rats. Greg Nicotero came up to me at lunch one day to show me the fake rat for approval, and I turned around and I just screamed. [Laughs]

Q: Your episode of The Walking Dead this season features a large action set-piece. How does it compare to the action scenes you've done on Breaking Bad?


A: I actually approach both of them the same way, which is I plan everything out ahead of time, like a military operation, basically. In order to really pull this off you've gotta be really prepared. This one is different, though, because there are a lot more people. I looked at the call sheet and I have never seen so many people on a call sheet before. You've got your cast, then you've got your hero zombies, then you've got your stunt zombies, and suddenly the entire page is filled with actors. It's a challenge, because it's a lot of coverage.

Q: What are some strategies you've picked up for filming such a complicated scene with so many people?

A: We actually had to think of a lot more logisitics: The amount of time it takes for the makeup, the amount of time it takes to resquib, the amount of people that we have to cover. So we came up with a plan to have different groups of zombies so that while we shoot one group we're squibbing the other, and while we're resquibbing the first group we turn around and shoot coverage on the shooters. I don't think you're gonna get everything you need unless you approach it that way. But also -- and this is the hard part for me -- you have to let go of some of your shots. Because you're not going to get everything. So right before lunch we got a fair amount of squibbing, but we don't have everything that I would like to have. But we made the decision to move on to the next piece of the puzzle, so at the very least we get the basic story and we can cut it together. And then hopefully, we can have enough time to go back and get some more zombie squibbing later.

Q: Your first The Walking Dead episode was named for its gore; this episode has a fair amount of blood and guts as well. Are you becoming desensitized to Greg Nicotero's handywork yet?

A: I always judge the effectiveness by the "ew" factor. I mean, it grosses me out -- I love looking at it first of all for the story, I know it's not real, but if I'm grossed out by it, that's awesome. I suppose I'm not used to it... I'm still not used to it, but I love it.

and new 30 second promo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6aGugUaBHIc
« Last Edit: September 19, 2011, 01:54:42 pm by Mac »
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Chiprocks1

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Re: The Walking Dead (Season 2)
« Reply #26 on: September 19, 2011, 02:19:02 pm »
Those bastards copied my Star Rating system, minus 1 Star.  ;D
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Mac

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Re: The Walking Dead (Season 2)
« Reply #27 on: September 19, 2011, 03:25:28 pm »
 ;D

didn't notice... til now
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Re: The Walking Dead (Season 2)
« Reply #28 on: September 22, 2011, 10:25:15 am »
Ugh...

The Talking Dead

Quote
AMC is launching "Talking Dead," the network's first live after show that will discuss AMC's series, "The Walking Dead," says Deadline.

The half-hour program, produced by Michael Davies' Embassy Row and hosted by Chris Hardwick, will premiere on October 16, immediately following the encore presentation of "The Walking Dead." Then beginning on Friday, November 4, the series premieres following "The Walking Dead's" encore presentation at 11 PM. The project was originally piloted last month.

"Talking Dead" will features Hardwick talking to fans, actors, producers and TV enthusiasts, recapping that most recent Dead episode, and taking questions and comments from viewers.
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Re: The Walking Dead (Season 2)
« Reply #29 on: September 26, 2011, 09:33:21 am »
The Walking Dead's production designer Greg Melton explains how to devastate a stretch of Georgia highway, shares what goes into building a barn and explains what all that teaches him about surviving the apocalypse.

Quote
Q: In Season 1, you created a devastated downtown Atlanta. For Season 2, you got a stretch of devastated highway. How did they compare?

A: They were pretty similar, actually as far as getting them organized, and doing your homework and getting the blocking and positioning of things that need to happen as the scene unfolds. We got really great cooperation down here from the Georgia Department of Transportation to shut down a big four-lane highway, which was the biggest thing -- we needed something major. Once we had that, it was just a matter of trying to figure out how many cars would tell the story. I think at one point, on our biggest day, we put almost 200 vehicles into that set, which was over a quarter of a mile long.

Q: And then you have to dress each of the vehicles...

A: Exactly. It's all people who are fleeing, so they're filled with bags and lots of stuff. And then it's been sitting there for weeks, so we have to come through and do a real heavy aging pass on everything. And then we trashed the highway. Literally. We were dumping bags and bags of trash and things. Everywhere you could see. We created two or three wrecks with burnt grass in the median. I love doing sets like that because you just stand out there and you start putting things around. There are only so many floor plans you can do. And then you gotta stand there in that space and just make it happen.

Q: What's been the biggest challenge in Season 2?

A: The biggest challenge was to find the perfect farm. Ever since the end of the first season, everybody's like "The Farm!" And I couldn't even think about it: Are we gonna build it? Are we gonna find something? Are we gonna find half of something and build the other half? It really all takes place here. Having said that, once we got it, there were still things we had to work into it like building the barn and then putting a position in for the camp for everyone to hang out. So between the house and the barn and the camp we created this nice sort of triangle of action and story.

Q: Did any work have to go into dressing the house, or are you shooting it as-is?

A: The exterior of the house, for the most part, we're shooting as is. We ended up basically emptying the entire inside of the house and redressing it for our needs as Hershel's farmhouse. But the exterior of the house was perfect the way it was.

Q: Cinematographer David Boyd told us you designed the barn to look alive. What was the inspiration for that?

A: Initially there was some talk about maybe burning the barn, so I was real interested in giving the barn a kind of face. So it kind of had a personality and if we were going to do the burn it would be very dramatic to see this screaming face down in the meadow. But the approach, it's much like with the house -- the house at first glance is just sort of this beautiful setting and it's a lovely farmhouse. And then at times, there are certain ways you can shoot it, or find an angle and it can look very disturbing and menacing. And I wanted the barn to have the same feeling. Like, "Oh isn't that a lovely barn sitting out in the pasture," and then to find that way to tilt it into that sort of horror -- it's an ominous, dreadful place.

Q: The barn looks like it's been there 100 years, but is actually brand new. How did you achieve that look?


A: We actually bought an old roof off of a barn down here in Georgia and we got this beautifully aged and rusted tin roof that's been around for 80, 90 years. That aspect of it is old, but everything else is new. It's literally delivered brand new wood, and then we just did our aging passes with it. I wanted it to not be too dark because we're going to have nighttime work around it, so I kind of skewed it towards a more greyed out, washed out so it would catch moonlight.

Q: Having dressed all these sets, do you know what you'd do in the event of an apocalypse?


A: Yeah. It's interesting because as you go through this show you realize there's really nowhere to run. That's one thing I've learned about this apocalypse. And so I think I would probably hunker down in my own house and fortify it and try to ride it out. It's not like there's a hurricane coming that's gonna destroy the house. It's just, can you defend it? You might as well just stay put and protect yourself. Kind of the way Morgan did in the Pilot. He fortified the house and was able to live there and stay quiet. There's something to be said for that in a zombie apocalypse. [Laughs] Be quiet.
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